How we work
© Paul Nicklen / National Geographic Creative / WWF-Canada
Arctic Ocean

As the Arctic's ice melts, the world is eyeing the shipping routes and natural resources of the Arctic Ocean.

Why it matters

90% of goods travel by ship, and Arctic routes are opening up
Vast resources are becoming available
Warming waters bring new challenges
Marine ecosystems transcend political boundaries
A noisier Arctic disrupts marine life

Publications

Canada’s Arctic Marine Atlas
Canada’s Arctic Marine Atlas
17 September 2018
Canadian Arctic Greywater Report
Canadian Arctic Greywater Report
17 August 2018
Circumpolar Conservation of Walruses
Circumpolar Conservation of Walruses
4 May 2018
Greenland Mariners' Guide
Greenland Mariners' Guide
27 September 2017
The Circle 02.17
The Circle 02.17
1 August 2017
Prospects and opportunities for using LNG for bunkering in the Arctic regions of Russia
Prospects and opportunities for using LNG for bunkering in the Arctic regions of Russia
1 July 2017

Meet the team

Tom Arnbom

Tom Arnbom

WWF-Sweden

Senior Advisor, Arctic and marine

Elena Agarkova Belov

Elena Agarkova Belov

WWF-US

Senior program officer, WWF-US Arctic Field Program

Doug Chiasson

Doug Chiasson

WWF-Canada

Senior Specialist, Arctic Fisheries

Andrew Dumbrille

Andrew Dumbrille

WWF-Canada

Senior Specialist, Arctic shipping

Martine Giangioppi

Martine Giangioppi

WWF-Canada

Senior specialist, Arctic marine conservation

Melissa Nacke

Melissa Nacke

WWF-Canada

Specialist, Arctic shipping and marine conservation

Simon Walmsley

Simon Walmsley

WWF Arctic Coordinating Team

Senior Specialist, Arctic Sustainable Development

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Recommended reading

Shipping

Global demand for goods continues to grow while Arctic summer sea ice is shrinking: Arctic shipping is heating up.

Oil and gas

The Arctic could hold some of the world's largest remaining untapped oil and gas reserves. Sustainability must be prioritized over exploitation in the Arctic because the implications are global.