How we work
© Staffan Widstrand / WWF

Arctic communities

WWF works with communities throughout the Arctic to help them deal with the effects of climate change, support research, and bring northern stories to a global audience.

Why it matters

Nowhere on Earth are the immediate effects of climate change felt so intensely. New economic opportunities are coming to the Arctic as oil and gas, shipping, and tourism, while melting permafrost and changes to the patterns of game animals are changing the face of life in the north.

4 MILLION
people live in the Arctic, about half of them in Russia.
ABOUT 10%
of the Arctic's population are Indigenous, according to the Arctic Council.

Solutions

© Global Warming Images / WWF
Valuing knowledge

Knowledge comes from many places. In the Arctic, we speak of our work as being “knowledge-based” rather than solely “science-based”. Indigenous peoples of the Arctic have a store of ecological knowledge based on their own observations of the environment, and on information handed down over generations.

WWF encourages the use of this traditional ecological knowledge to inform management policies in the Arctic. We have supported several projects that collect this form of knowledge, helping to provide a more rounded knowledge base.

For thousands of years, Arctic Indigenous peoples have hunted animals for food, clothing, and other essential uses. Hunting is still part of the cultural identity of many northern peoples, and for some, still an essential part of their livelihoods. People still hunt because other foods available to people in northern communities are often less healthy than traditional foods, and too expensive for people to buy.

Learn more

© Staffan Widstrand / WWF

How we work

Publications

Canada’s Arctic Marine Atlas
Canada’s Arctic Marine Atlas
17 September 2018
The Last Ice Area introduction
The Last Ice Area introduction
15 September 2018
The Circle 03.18
The Circle 03.18
17 July 2018
The Circle 02.18
The Circle 02.18
5 June 2018
The Circle 01.18
The Circle 01.18
1 May 2018
The Circle 03.17
The Circle 03.17
1 February 2018

Meet the team

WWF-US

Director of Education and Outreach, WWF-US Arctic Field Program

WWF-Canada

Senior Specialist, Arctic Fisheries

WWF-Canada

Vice President, Arctic

WWF-Denmark

Senior Advisor, Greenland and the Arctic

WWF-Canada

Senior specialist, Arctic marine conservation

WWF

Advisor, Nature Conservation – WWF Netherlands

WWF-Canada

Specialist, Eastern Arctic

WWF-Russia

Advisor, Environmental Law

WWF-US

Senior Program Officer, Arctic Wildlife

WWF-Canada

Specialist, renewable energy, Arctic

WWF-Canada

Specialist, Western Arctic

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Recommended reading

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Arctic Climate Change

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